Living in Denmark – University of Copenhagen

Forward this page to a friend Resize Print Bookmark and Share

Bachelor > Living in Denmark

Living in Denmark

To get a good start to your life as a student in Denmark, it may be useful to know a little about Denmark and the Danes, as well as a few practical issues.

Photo: Scanpix Denmark

Denmark at a Glance

Denmark is a modern welfare state with a population of 5.6 million of which 1.2 million live in the capital of Copenhagen. Denmark is situated in Northern Europe and is part of the Scandinavian countries. The country has more than 7,000 km of coastline, and even if you live in one of the cities, you are never far away from the sea and you have easy access to the beautiful countryside.

Photo: denmark.dk

Denmark is world-famous for modern design, and it is also known to be a green nation with a strong focus on greentech. It is a nation of cyclists. Bikes are an environmentally friendly means of transportation and they offer a cheap way to get around; something much appreciated by students. Designated cycling paths make it easy and convenient for you to get around Copenhagen on your bike.

Denmark is a monarchy, but politically it is a democracy with a multi-party system. All legislative powers are vested in a unicameral parliament which is located right in the heart of Copenhagen. The Danish welfare model is based on the principle that all citizens have equal rights to social security. 

Being a knowledgebased society, Denmark is dependent on a high level of education. Copenhagen is home to a range of institutions of higher education of which the University of Copenhagen is the oldest and the largest.

Meeting the Danes

Studying at the University of Copenhagen means moving to Denmark and living amongst the Danes. You might wonder what the Danes are like?

Residence Permit

To stay in Denmark for the duration of the study programme, international students will be required be to obtain a residence permit. The application procedure depends on your citizenship. When you have arrived in Denmark and registered with the local authorities, you will be covered by The Danish Health Security Act.

Finding Housing

Some faculties at the university offer accommodation in Copenhagen through the faculty housing service. If the faculty has a housing service, you can read more about it in relation to the specific programme, you want to study.

You may also choose to find accommodation on your own. In that case, you may wish to make use of some of our tips on how to get started.